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RESEARCH

Our research focuses on understanding how the normal bacteria in the upper respiratory tract influence the risk of colonization by bacterial respiratory pathogens. Our long-term goal is to develop the first rationally-designed probiotics for the prevention of pneumonia and other respiratory infections.

BRAVE KIDS: A BIOREPOSITORY STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH SARS-COV-2 INFECTION OR EXPOSURE

THE ROLE OF THE RESPIRATORY MICROBIOME IN PREVENTING CHILDHOOD RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

IMPACT OF THE GUT MICROBIOME ON OUTCOMES OF CHILDREN UNDERGOING STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

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We are currently conducting a prospective cohort study of children and young adults with COVID-19 or who have a close household contact with COVID-19. Children appear to be at lower risk of acquiring SARS-CoV-2 infection, and SARS-CoV-2-infected children often have mild or no symptoms. The primary objective of this study is to determine the biological or immunological factors that account for the low susceptibility and disease severity of children.

Our clinical research efforts based in Gaborone, Botswana aim to understand the factors that influence the development of the respiratory microbiome during infancy and the role that these commensal bacteria play in preventing pneumonia pathogen colonization and infection among infants.

Our research in pediatric stem cell transplant recipients aims to determine the impact of the gut microbiome on the outcomes of children after transplantation. We are seeking to evaluate the ability of longitudinal gut microbiome data to predict the risk of bloodstream infection and acute graft-versus-host disease. In addition, we aim to identify commensal gut bacteria that are associated with a reduce risk of these outcomes and thus could serve as candidate probiotics in this patient population.

RESEARCH: Research
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